Thomas Moreton

d. before 1851
ChartsDescendant Chart for William Selvey
(Child) BirthThomas Moreton was born at England. 
(Groom) MarriageThomas married Mary Selvey, daughter of William Selvey and Mary Gill, on August 12, 1822 at Sedgley, Staffordshire, England..  
(Daughter) BirthA daughter, Catherine, was born on December 30, 1822 at Staffordshire, England. 
(Daughter) BirthA daughter, Teresa, was born on April 7, 1830 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. 
ResidenceHe and Mary lived in 1841 at Walsall Street, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. Also living with them was Teresa Moreton. Thomas was a Steel Toy Maker. 
(Deceased) DeathThomas died before 1851 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England.  

Family

Mary Selvey b. about 1796, d. before January 13, 1853
Children
Last EditedMay 13, 2010

George Morgan

d. before 1847
(Son) BirthA son, William, was born circa 1818. 
(Deceased) DeathGeorge died before 1847.  

Family

Child
Last EditedOctober 6, 2010

William Morgan

b. circa 1818
FatherGeorge Morgan d. before 1847
(Child) BirthWilliam Morgan was born circa 1818. 
OccupationWilliam was a Locksmith in 1847 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. 
(First) MarriageWilliam's first marriage was to Harriet Careless, daughter of John Careless and Elizabeth (?), on May 20, 1847 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England..  
(Second) MarriageWilliam's second marriage was to Amelia Sophia Dingley on June 28, 1862 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England.  

Family 1

Harriet Careless b. before November 24, 1817, d. before May 9, 1848

Family 2

Amelia Sophia Dingley
Last EditedJanuary 7, 2012

Edward Morris

b. before 1822
FatherEdward Morris
(Child) BirthEdward Morris was born before 1822 at England. 
OccupationEdward was a Hammer maker in 1843. 
ResidenceHe and Edward lived before March 12, 1843 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. Edward was a Castor. 
(Groom) MarriageEdward married Ann Washbrook, daughter of Samuel Washbrook and Ann Devey, on March 12, 1843 at St. Peter's, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England..  
(Son) BirthA son, John, was born about 1845 at Staffordshire, England. 
ResidenceHe lived in the household of Samuel Washbrook and Ann Devey, and with Esther Washbrook, George Washbrook, Harriet Washbrook, Sarah Washbrook, John Washbrook, Phoebe Washbrook, William Robinson, Henry Washbrook, David Washbrook and John Morris in 1851 at Waterloo Sq., Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. 

Family

Ann Washbrook b. before January 10, 1825
Child
Last EditedJanuary 7, 2012

Edward Morris

(Son) BirthA son, Edward, was born before 1822 at England. 
ResidenceHe and Edward lived before March 12, 1843 at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. Edward was a Castor. 

Family

Child
Last EditedMay 8, 2010

Ellen Morris

b. about 1851, d. December 31, 1881
ChartsDescendant Chart for William Bakewell
(Child) BirthEllen Morris was born about 1851 at Ireland. 
(Bride) MarriageEllen married John J. Bakewell Sr., son of William Bakewell and Bridget Conry, on August 16, 1874 at Philadelphia, PA..  
(Deceased) DeathEllen died on December 31, 1881 at 27 Gosomer Street, Philadelphia, PA.  
(Interred) BurialShe was buried on January 3, 1882 at New Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA,
Sec. M, Range B, Grave 25.
 

Family

John J. Bakewell Sr. b. about 1850, d. October 16, 1910
Last EditedNovember 10, 2019

John Morris

b. about 1845
FatherEdward Morris b. before 1822
MotherAnn Washbrook b. before January 10, 1825
(Child) BirthJohn Morris was born about 1845 at Staffordshire, England. 
ResidenceHe lived in the household of Samuel Washbrook and Ann Devey, and with Esther Washbrook, George Washbrook, Harriet Washbrook, Sarah Washbrook, John Washbrook, Phoebe Washbrook, William Robinson, Henry Washbrook, David Washbrook and Edward Morris in 1851 at Waterloo Sq., Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England. 
Last EditedMay 8, 2010

Maria Morris

b. about 1836, d. May 18, 1905
(Child) BirthMaria Morris was born about 1836 at Ireland. 
ImmigrationShe immigrated about 1850.  
(Bride) MarriageMaria married James Tristram, son of Samuel Tristram and Rebecca Connell, on February 26, 1859 at NY..  
(Son) BirthA son, James, was born in May, 1860. 
(Daughter) BirthA daughter, Maria, was born in May, 1860 at Manhattan, NY. 
1860 US CensusShe, listed as 26 years old, appeared with her husband James Tristram, 21 years old, on the 1860 Federal Census of Manhattan, NY, recorded June 8, 1860. Their children, James, 1 month old, and Maria Tristram, 1 month old, were listed as living with them. 
(Son) BirthA son, William, was born on September 5, 1863 at Manhattan, NY. 
(Son) BirthA son, Richard, was born on July 16, 1865. 
(Son) BirthA son, Thomas, was born about 1867. 
(Son) BirthA son, John, was born about 1869. 
(Son) BirthA son, William, was born about 1871 at CT. 
(Daughter) BirthA daughter, Maria, was born on November 14, 1875 at CT. 
ResidenceShe and James Tristram lived on June 5, 1880 at 10 Oak Street, Manhattan, NY. Also living with them was Richard Tristram, Thomas Tristram, John Tristram, William Tristram, Maria Tristram and James J. Tristram. James (father), James (son), Richard, Thomas and John were Wire Makers. 
(Son) DeathThomas died on January 20, 1887 at White Plains, NY. 
(Son) DeathJohn died on January 20, 1887 at White Plains, NY. 
Newspaper ClippingThe following newspaper article appeared in New York Tribune on January 23, 1887:
BOLD BURGLARS IDENTIFIED,
UNABLE TO ACCOUNT FOR THEIR ACTION.
A FATHER'S GRIEF THAT HIS SONS, SHOULD GO ASTRAY-WERE THEY KILLED?

The bodies of the t w o burglars who were killed at White Plains on Thursday night-have been identified as those of John and Thomas Tristram, of this city. They are sons of James Tristram, a wire cloth and sieve, maker living in a tenement-house.at No. 130 1/2 Monroe st, this city. Until last Tuesday they were employed by their brothers, Richard and James Tristram, jr ., who are engaged in the manufacture of sieves on the third loft-of the building No. 195 Water-st. The family, composed of the father and mother and five brothers, is in moderate circumstances- and lives comfortably. The younger brothers, Thomas, ago nineteen; John, "age sixteen, and William, age fifteen, and the father were ostensibly in- the employ of the two elder brothers, James, Jr., and Richard and business was done under the firm name of Tristram Brothers, although it was understood by those who know that all had an interest in the profits.

Early Thursday morning Thomas, John and William left their home, giving their parents and brothers the impression that that they were going to their workshop. They wore not seen again during the day and thelr absence caused much worriment. On Thursday evening at 9:30 o'clock, William, the youngest brother, returned to his home and said that he had been to Coney Island and .that he had been sent home by his brothers, who intended to return by a later train. The parents, realizing that there was little to attract people to Coney Island at this season of the year, questioned their son closely, "but were unable to elicit any more definite information from him. Late on Friday evening Mr. Tristram read a description of the young men who had been killed at White Plains. It tallied so closely with the general appearance of his missing sons that he was impelled to send James and Richard to White Plains yesterday morning. As soon as they saw the bodies of the dead men they recognized them as their brothers.

Mr. Tristram, who is past sixty years of age, was found in the afternoon at the. loft, where he assists his sons. When a reporter entered the room he sat on a pile of boxes, swaying to and fro and sobbing like a child. He seemed to be nearly beside himself with grief and it was with difficulty he told of the disappearance of his sons.

"Tom and John," he said •”were good boys and never went around with the gangs which infest the' neighborhood in which we live. They were seldom out of the house and then only with my permission to go to the theatre, ' of which they were very fond. They worked steadily, never drank and never had any firearms in their possession. What possessed them to run away and to buy revolvers and knives I am wholly at a loss to comprehend. They could always obtain enough money to meet their wants and although they worked hard, they never seemed to be dissatisfied with their condition, if they were guilty of the murder with which they are charged the only way I can account for it is that- they were insane, and as for their shooting themselves, 1 regard that as a preposterous assertion made to cloak the deeds of those who shot them down In cold blood. They were innocent, surely innocent"

The announcement that John and Thomas Tristram were the so-called desperadoes was received -with much surprise by those who had known the young men.. In the neighborhoods where they lived and worked they were generally regarded- as being young men of exceptionally good morals and character. The loft In which they worked has been rented for the last; seven years from George L. Squires, who occupies the' ground floor and who has seen thorn almost daily for that length of time.

“I looked upon those two boys," he said, "as model young men. They were always quiet and modest in their demeanor and seemed never to have a disposition to engage in boyish amusements or pranks of any kind. Their education had been necessarily limited and they were obliged to work before they had reached their teens. This tended to make them old before their time. It is apparent from the firearms they carried that they had been .reading dime novels and witnessing blood and thunder dramas, had been imbued with, the• spirit of adventure and- were going West to fight Indians.. They knew little of the geography of the country and probably thought White Plains was the place- where Indians abounded."

Mrs. Tristram, a matronly looking woman of fifty-five or thereabouts, was found at her homo last evening in the midst of-a group of women who had come in to console her. At her side was her youngest son, William, who said that he and his brothers went from: their home Thursday direct to the Grand Central Station, where they purchased tickets to Patterson,-a station on the Harlem Railroad sixty miles from this city, and went there on the train starting at 10:30 am. Upon arriving at Patterson the three alighted and walked about the village for a time and then along the railroad track to Towner's, two mile south. Here they boarded a New York and Northern train and rode to White Plains. William was told to go home at once. John and Thomas had only 40 cents between them. William: reached his home at 9:30 p. m.

Mrs. Tristram said that her son John had been sick with intermittent fever for three weeks. "Neither of the boys was-over bright." she continued, “and they certainly must have .been crazy when they killed that poor man Mead. An uncle of theirs lives at White Plain. I never will believe that my boys would steal. Sooner than do that they would kill themselves."

The two elder; brothers, James and Richard, returned to the city last evening. Like their parents, they believe that John and Thomas wore insane with fright when they killed themselves, and. not being accustomed to the use of firearms, did not realize what they were doing when they fired at William Mead. They will go again to White Plains to-morrow to attend the inquest, which has been adjourned at the request of District- Attorney Baker.

The funeral of William Mead the murdered man, will take place at the Memorial Methodist' Church In. White Plains at 2 o'clock to-day.
ResidenceShe and James Tristram lived on February 16, 1892 at Brooklyn, NY. Also living with them was William Tristram, Maria Tristram and James J. Tristram. James and son James were Wireworkers and William was a Fireman. 
ResidenceShe and James Tristram lived on June 11, 1900 at Rockville Centre, NY. Also living with them was James J. Tristram, William Tristram and Maria Tristram. Maria is listed as having 6 children born, all still living.. James and James J. were Wire Weavers and William was a Manufacturer of Sieves. 
(Deceased) DeathMaria died on May 18, 1905 at Rockville Centre, Nassau County, NY.  

Family

James Tristram b. before February 15, 1832, d. October 2, 1909
Children
Last EditedFebruary 10, 2019

Lucy J. Mosher

b. April 16, 1879, d. October 1, 1963
(Child) BirthLucy J. Mosher was born on April 16, 1879 at Sherman, CT. 
(Bride) MarriageLucy married Alpheus Bradley Durgy, son of John J. Durgy and Clarinda L. Wildman..  
(Daughter) BirthA daughter, Irene, was born on January 29, 1899 at New Fairfield, CT. 
(Son) BirthA son, Edrick, was born on June 8, 1908 at New Fairfield, CT. 
(Spouse) Death On February 5, 1947 her husband, Alpheus, died at Danbury, CT, at age 68. 
(Deceased) DeathLucy died on October 1, 1963, at age 84.  
(Interred) BurialShe was buried at Wooster Cemetery, Danbury, CT.
 

Family

Alpheus Bradley Durgy b. November 16, 1878, d. February 5, 1947
Children
Last EditedMay 29, 2008

Adrian Moss

b. about 1869
FatherJohn R. Moss b. about 1820
MotherEliza (?) b. about 1835
Name Variation Adrian Moss was also known as John C. Moss. 
(Child) BirthAdrian Moss was born about 1869 at NY Is "John C." listed in the 1870 census the same person as "Adrian" listed in the 1880 census? 
ResidenceHe lived in the household of John R. Moss and Eliza Moss, and with Frank Moss, Lincoln Moss and Jessica F. Moss on July 5, 1870 at Manhattan, NY. 
ResidenceHe lived in the household of John R. Moss and Eliza Moss, and with Frank Moss, Lincoln Moss, Jessica F. Moss, Olive Moss and Aldine Moss on June 2, 1880 at 574 3rd Avenue, Manhattan, NY. 
Last EditedJune 8, 2011